Climate Analogues

The “Farms of the future” arrives in West Africa

2013-11-05 / Posted by analogues_admin

Autor: Mathieu Ouédraogo

The ‘Farms of the Future’ tool provides a real opportunity for farmers in a given place to consider how their climate and related agricultural system will be in the future. Photo: A. Jarvis (CIAT)

The ‘Farms of the Future’ tool provides a real opportunity for farmers in a given place to consider how their climate and related agricultural system will be in the future. Photo: A. Jarvis (CIAT) (view original)

Building adaptive capacity to climate change in West Africa through implementation of ‘Farms of the future’ approach

Variability and climate change represent key threats to agriculture, food security and small-scale subsistence agriculture in West Africa. The so far fragile agricultural production systems are challenged by the impacts of climate changes which, therefore, affect million of population depending on subsistence agriculture.

Those particular farmers use endogenous agricultural practices and apply techniques to respond the situation with the support of technical training agencies (governmental trainers, executives of rural development projects and non-governmental organizations, extension services, executives of farmers’ organizations networks).

Building farmers’ adaptive capacities

A regional training workshop on climate analogue and ‘farms of the future’ approach focused on tools for building farmers’ adaptive capacity to the impacts of climate change in West Africa was held at the AFRICA HALL conference room in Niamey, Niger from 3rd to 5th October 2013. It was initiated by CCAFS West Africa and the Institute for Sahel (INSAH) and was attended by participants from Burkina Faso, Ghana, Mali, Niger and Senegal.

The workshop aimed at building technical stakeholders’ capacity on the use of climate analogue tool and its ‘farms of the future’ approach to improve the adaptive capacity to climate changes.

The «climate analogues» tool was jointly developed under the leadership and with the financial support of Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Walker Institute of the University of Reading (GB), International Center for Tropical Agriculture CIAT (Colombia), and Climate Impacts Group of the University of Leeds (GB).

Read the full article here.